In the News


World War II weapon used in new battle: Combating Parkinson’s disease

Thursday, December 6th, 2018 - WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – A World War II chemical weapon antidote is shown to be effective combating a new enemy: Parkinson’s disease. Parkinson’s is characterized by the steady and progressive loss of brain cells. Those afflicted show early symptoms of trembling in their hands, arms, legs, jaw and face. It can progress to the point...



Research shows how service dogs can help veterans with PTSD

Wednesday, November 7th, 2018 - WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — For veterans struggling with post-traumatic stress disorder, service dogs might be able to offer both behavioral and physiological benefits to help counter some of those symptoms, according to research that is being led by the Purdue College of Veterinary Medicine. MagMaggie O’Hairesistant professor of human-animal interaction in the College of Veterinary Medicine,...



Dogs are helping scientists discover better cancer treatments

Friday, October 12th, 2018 - Can dogs help treat or even cure cancer in humans? A growing body of research shows man’s best friend is speeding up the development of cancer-fighting drugs. Scientists say humans and dogs are about 95 percent identical genetically and cancer affects them in the same way it does us. “The cancer that dogs develop is...



Cancer researchers at Purdue aim to take the ‘accelerator’ off aggressive prostate and other deadly tumors

Thursday, October 4th, 2018 - Purdue University researchers are studying ways to make prostate cancer, ranked as the second most common and second most fatal cancer among men by the American Cancer Society, less lethal by making it less aggressive.   The Purdue team has developed a drug to target the laminin receptor (37/67 LR), a membrane protein that when...



PVM establishes National Academy for Veterinary Medicine to increase diversity and address veterinarian shortages

Tuesday, September 18th, 2018 - WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. —  With help from a new federal grant, the Purdue College of Veterinary Medicine is stepping up to expand access to the veterinary profession for talented  individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds  and address the need for more veterinarians serving rural areas and protecting food safety. The Health Resources and Services Administration, an agency...



Indiana’s only Fear Free veterinary clinic soothes with pheromones, whipped cream

Friday, September 7th, 2018 - Fear Free is part of a larger movement in veterinary medicine that looks to pay more attention to animals’ mental states. About a third of veterinary schools have animal behaviorists such as herself on their faculty, who teach similar methods, said Niwako Ogata, an associate professor at Purdue University’s College of Veterinary Medicine. Programs such as...



As Animal-Assisted Therapy Thrives, Enter the Cats

Thursday, September 6th, 2018 - In her first bout with breast cancer, Kate Benjamin got by with a lumpectomy and radiation. The second time was far more grueling: a 14-hour double mastectomy in November, followed by an eight-week course of chemotherapy that ended in May. Throughout it all, she has been surrounded by cats. Ms. Benjamin, 47, is an expert...



New Therapy Could Reverse Type 1 Diabetes In Humans And Dogs

Tuesday, August 28th, 2018 - Researchers at Purdue University and Indiana University School of Medicine (IU) are working with man’s best friend to cure one of his most insidious diseases. The scientists say a new therapy shows promise for long-term reversal of Type 1 diabetes in both humans and dogs. Purdue reported this week that scientists achieved normal glucose levels in diabetes-induced mice by...



Preventing Foodborne Illness

Tuesday, August 21st, 2018 - According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 48 million Americans are affected by a foodborne disease each year. That’s one in every six Americans. More than 100,000 will have to visit the hospital each year and 3,000 Americans lose their lives due to foodborne diseases. Hoosiers are no strangers to outbreaks of foodborne illness. But...



Chilling with the chickens, a different type of pet therapy

Thursday, August 2nd, 2018 - Pets can relieve stress in at least eight specific ways, according to Dr. Alan Beck, director of the Center for the Human–Animal Bond at the Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine. Petting an animal or just being in the room with one can lower blood pressure and increase cardiovascular health. Pet owners tend to get...




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