Residency and Internship Programs

Matching Program

The Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine offers post-DVM students the opportunity to further their veterinary skills through internship and residency programs.

Residencies, designed to provide advanced training and to satisfy requirements for certification as specialists, are offered in a variety of clinical areas by the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (VCS). Successful completion of an internship or equivalent practice experience is required prior to admission in a residency program. A residency consists of three years of clinical study, research, teaching, and formal coursework. It is designed to provide the resident with an intensive clinical experience under the guidance of the clinical faculty. In conjunction with the residency program, a graduate degree or clinical investigator program must be pursued. Refer to each specialty for specific requirements and opportunities.

VCS maintains residencies in the following: anesthesiology, cardiology, comparative oncology, comparative ophthalmology, diagnostic imaging, emergency and critical care, large animal internal medicine, large animal surgery, neurology, radiation oncology, small animal internal medicine, and small animal surgery.

Internships are offered by the Purdue University Veterinary Teaching Hospital and are a 12 1/2-month clinical program providing advanced training in medicine and surgery. The program is designed to qualify the individual for entry into an approved residency program leading to board certification in a recognized veterinary specialty.

NOTE TO APPLICANTS:


2021-2024 Programs


Small Animal Residencies

Comparative Oncology

The Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Purdue University invites applications for a Comparative Oncology Residency Program. The three-year residency program will begin July 15, 2021, and will end July 14, 2024.  Applicants are required to have a DVM degree and either a rotating internship or equivalent internship or practice experience.  The program is designed to provide advanced training in veterinary medical oncology and to satisfy the ACVIM requirements for board certification in the specialty of oncology.  

The residency program is conducted by the Purdue Comparative Oncology Program (PCOP). The PCOP, which was established in 1979, has the goals of: clinical investigation, education, and compassionate patient care. Residents fill a key role in providing compassionate clinical patient care under the supervision of a faculty member, and the medical care of patients in clinical trials. In addition to clinical training and responsibilities, residents will have the opportunity to develop clinical research techniques, writing skills, and lecture preparation/delivery skills. Involvement in a clinical, translational, or basic scientific research project under the supervision of a senior faculty member is required. Publication of the research findings in a refereed scientific journal is expected, and the manuscript must be submitted for publication before a residency certificate will be granted. Residents are expected to present one seminar each year to the Department and may also be required to present a small number of didactic lectures. Residents are expected to participate in the clinical teaching of interns, veterinary students and veterinary nursing students, and a commitment to further development of their teaching skills is expected. 

Financial support for this residency position will be provided by MedVet (http://www.medvetforpets.com/). The candidate selected for this residency position will have a post-residency employment commitment at a MedVet hospital. MedVet is one of the largest private specialty practices in the country and is made up of 30 veterinarian-owned and led emergency and multi-specialty hospitals located across 15 states. Both MedVet and PCOP will participate in the evaluation of candidates applying for the residency position.  Although the majority of the training completed during this residency will occur at Purdue, up to 4 weeks per year of the second and third years of residency training will be completed at a MedVet hospital location.  In addition to interviewing with Purdue faculty, a separate virtual discussion will be arranged with MedVet representatives to discuss the position, sponsoring and the terms of the post-residency employment commitment. The Director of Post-Graduate Medical Education, Dr. Jon Fletcher, should be contacted (jon.fletcher@medvet.com) for additional information about MedVet and the post-residency employment commitment.

Residents are required to enroll in the Department’s Clinical and Translational Research Master of Science degree program unless non-enrollment is approved by the Department Head. The M.S. graduate program (thesis or non-thesis option) is designed to develop the resident's ability to conduct clinical and translational research and augments the residency program.

The Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine values, nurtures, and respects all members of its community and ensures an environment of inclusive excellence where all students, faculty, and staff are inspired and empowered to achieve their full potential. Purdue University is an EOE/AA employer fully committed to achieving a diverse work force. All individuals, including minorities, women, individuals with disabilities and protected veterans are encouraged to apply.  Employment is on an annual basis with continuation in the program dependent upon satisfactory periodic evaluations.

 *Description on Web address:

http://www.vet.purdue.edu/vcs/match/

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Diagnostic Imaging

The Diagnostic Imaging Residency at Purdue University is a four-year program (out of VIRMP) that is designed to provide advanced training in Diagnostic Imaging and to satisfy both the American College of Veterinary Radiology (ACVR) and European College of Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging (ECVDI) residency requirements. Individuals interested in pursuing an academic career are encouraged to apply.

The applicant must possess excellent interpersonal and communication skills and a demonstrated ability to work with others in a collegial team atmosphere. A veterinary degree and interest in advanced training in diagnostic imaging is required. A completed rotating internship in small or large animal medicine/surgery or equivalent experience is required. Please email your application (letter of intent + CV +academic transcript + 3 referee letters) to Dr. Hock Gan Heng at hheng@purdue.edu. The closing date for submitting the application is November 11, 2020. The faculty will review your completed application and will then determine whether a virtual interview will be arranged by November 25, 2020. Virtual interviews are mandatory for shortlisted candidates. Interview dates will be from December 9-13, 2020.

Residents rotate between the radiology, ultrasound and advanced imaging services in accordance with ACVR/ECVDI requirements.  Residents evaluate images under the direct supervision of faculty.  Daily faculty backup will be present during these times and dictated reports will be evaluated by these faculties. The residents will be compensated for after-hours emergency cases.  Periods of off-clinic time will be assigned according to residency program. Applicant is required to pursue a Master’s degree graduate program as well as study for the qualifying examination of the ACVR/ECVDI. Diagnostic Imaging residents will participate in known case conference rounds, diagnostic imaging journal club, and daily diagnostic imaging rounds. Diagnostic Imaging residents will have opportunities to attend conferences related to the field of diagnostic imaging. A full description of the residency program and a more specific breakdown of clinical duties is located on the ACVR website (http://www.acvr.org/) or ECVDI website (http://www.ecvdi.org/). Employment is on an annual basis, with continuation in the program dependent upon favorable periodic evaluations.

The diagnostic imaging section at Purdue University currently employs four full time board-certified radiologists. All radiologists have training in all modalities and diverse research interests. The section also employs four veterinary technicians with training in diagnostic imaging and one certified MRI/CT technician. The section currently has three small animal DR rooms, large animal DR room, a 64 slice CT scanner, a digital fluoroscope, 2 ultrasound machines, a gamma camera for nuclear imaging and a 1.5T MRI scanner.

In addition to clinical training and responsibilities, residents will have the opportunity to develop clinical research techniques, writing skills and lecture preparation/delivery skills.  Involvement in a clinical, translational, or fundamental research project under the supervision of a faculty member is required.  Publication of the research findings in a refereed scientific journal is expected, and the manuscript must be accepted for publication before a residency certificate will be granted.  Residents are expected to present one seminar each year to the department and may also be required to present a small number of didactic lectures. Residents are expected to participate in the clinical teaching of interns, veterinary students and veterinary technician students and a commitment to further development of their teaching skills is expected. 

For additional information, contact Dr. Hock Gan Heng, Diagnostic Imaging Section.  Telephone (765)-494-9011, E-Mail: hheng@purdue.edu 

The College of Veterinary Medicine at Purdue University values, nurtures and respects all members of its community and ensures an environment of inclusive excellence where all students, faculty and staff and inspired and empowered to achieve their full potential. Purdue University is an equal opportunity/equal access/affirmative action employer fully committed to achieving a diverse work force. Al individuals, including minorities, women, individuals with disabilities and protected veterans are encouraged to apply.

*Description of program on Web address:  https://s3.amazonaws.com/acvr-website/assets/20191126160953/purdue.pdf 

 

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Emergency Critical Care

The Small Animal Emergency and Critical Care (ECC) Residency at Purdue University provides advanced training in emergency and critical care medicine that meets or exceeds the training requirements outlined by the ACVECC for board certification. The majority of the three-year program is spent on the small animal emergency and critical care service with hands-on management of clinical cases while being directly supervised by board certified diplomats in emergency and critical care. The current emergency and critical care medicine faculty are:

The ECC residency is sustained by a broad caseload that is made up of a combination of local emergency, critical care and trauma cases as well as a diverse population of referral cases from the entire Midwest/Great Lakes region. The clinical aspects of the residency are supported by other hospital services such as anesthesia, surgery, internal medicine (including extracorporeal therapies), cardiology (including interventional procedures), neurology, diagnostic imaging, clinical pathology, ophthalmology, radiation and medical oncology. Each service offers a wide array of expertise in both diagnostic and treatment modalities. Emergency and critical care residents participate in biweekly resident review, biweekly small animal emergency and critical care journal club, and daily emergency and critical care rounds.

In addition to clinical training and responsibilities, residents will have the opportunity to develop proficiency in clinical research techniques, writing skills and lecture preparation/delivery. Involvement in a clinical, translational, or fundamental research project under the supervision of a senior faculty member is required. Publication of the research findings in a refereed scientific journal is expected prior to completion of the residency. Residents are expected to present one seminar each year to the department and will also be required to present a small number of didactic lectures. Residents are expected to participate in the clinical teaching of interns, veterinary students and veterinary nursing students. The resident will be required to complete a non-thesis or thesis Master of Science degree during his/her residency training. Candidates interested in pursuing a PhD may, with the endorsement of the faculty mentor(s), enroll in the Clinical Investigator Program, which is designed to develop the capability to conduct clinical and/or fundamental research. The Clinical Investigator Program strives to integrate residency training with research and requires graduate study and laboratory experience beyond a three year clinical residency. This program is a flexible, individualized course of study tailored to the career objective of the candidate and is contingent upon available funded research capabilities of the department, school, university and affiliated research centers.

Employment is on an annual basis, with continuation in the program being dependent upon favorable periodic evaluations.

The Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine values, nurtures, and respects all members of its community and ensures an environment of inclusive excellence where all students, faculty, and staff are inspired and empowered to achieve their full potential. Purdue University is an EOE/AA employer fully committed to achieving a diverse work force. All individuals, including minorities, women, individuals with disabilities and veterans are encouraged to apply.

For additional information contact Dr. Elizabeth Thomovsky, Small Animal Emergency and Critical Care Medicine. Telephone: (765) 494-1107, e-mail: ethomovs@purdue.edu

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Neurology

The Neurology Residency at Purdue University is a three-year program that is designed to provide advanced training in neurology and neurosurgery, and to satisfy the ACVIM residency requirements for board-certification in neurology. A rotating small animal internship is required.

The resident will participate in clinical rotations and assume primary responsibility for small animal patients. Large animal patients are examined on a consultation basis. The resident will participate in the neurological/neurosurgical emergency duty on a rotating basis among the neurology and small animal surgery residents. The majority of time will be spent on clinical neurology/neurosurgery rotations, with additional rotations in related areas required for competency and board-certification. Additional out-rotations at regional medical schools or hospitals may be arranged as available to observe additional neurology, neurosurgical, and/or electrophysiology procedures. Residents are encouraged to pursue the ACVIM Neurosurgery Certificate of Training during their residency. 

The current small animal neurology faculty consists of three permanent faculty members:

Timothy Bentley, BVSc, MRCVS, DACVIM (Neurology); Clinical Area: medical neurology and neurosurgery; Research: Intracranial surgery (neoplasia, hydrocephalus) and neuroradiology

Melissa Lewis, VMD, PhD, DACVIM (Neurology); Clinical Area: medical neurology and neurosurgery;  Research: spinal cord injury, electrophysiology and neuroradiology

Stephanie Thomovsky, DVM, MS, DACVIM (Neurology), CCRP, cVMA; Clinical Area: medical neurology, neurosurgery and physical rehabilitation; Research: Rehabilitation of the post-operative neurologic patient, paroxysmal dyskinesias, seizure management

The neurology service is part of the small animal surgery section and is strongly supported by the surgery faculty. Purdue University Veterinary Teaching Hospital is a well-equipped, multi-disciplinary veterinary referral hospital. Clinical facilities include fully-equipped surgical suites for spinal and intracranial procedures, minimally-invasive surgical equipment, electrodiagnostic capabilities, fully-equipped rehabilitation suite including underwater treadmill, and electrostimulation equipment. Advanced diagnostic imaging facilities on-site include 1.5T MRI, 64-slice CT scanner, fluoroscopy and nuclear medicine.  An in-house linear accelerator is available for stereotactic and hypofractionated radiation therapy.  Additional diagnostic modalities on campus include 3.0T MRI.  The canine brain tumor, spinal cord injury and neurologic rehabilitation caseload is ample, owing to clinical trials and other support. Purdue is currently constructing a new Veterinary Teaching Hospital (anticipated opening, March 2022).

In addition to clinical training and responsibilities, residents will have the opportunity to develop clinical research techniques, writing skills and lecture preparation/delivery skills.  Involvement in a clinical, translational, or fundamental research project under the supervision of a faculty member is required. Publication of the research findings in a refereed scientific journal is expected, and the manuscript must be submitted for publication before a residency certificate will be granted. Residents are expected to present one seminar each year to the department. The resident will be provided with opportunities to lecture to veterinary students and interns, and to assist in teaching laboratories. Residents are expected to participate in the clinical teaching of junior residents, interns, veterinary students and veterinary technician students. Residents are required to enroll in the department’s Clinical and Translational Research Master of Science degree program (http://www.vet.purdue.edu/vcs/vcsgradprogram/index.php) unless they already have a MS / PhD and enrollment is waived by the department head. The M.S. graduate program (thesis or non-thesis option) is designed to develop the resident's ability to conduct clinical and translational research and augments the residency program. Candidates may alternatively, with the agreement of the faculty mentor(s), enroll in a combined residency/PhD program.

Performance reviews will be conducted every 6 months, with annual renewal of employment contingent on satisfactory review of clinical performance, academic knowledge, and professional/ethical conduct. A residency certificate will be awarded upon successful completion of the program.

Applicants should submit a completed VIRMP application form, curriculum vitae, a letter of intent, veterinary college transcript and three to four letters of recommendation from faculty or employers familiar with the candidate’s clinical knowledge and skills.

Virtual interviews (video call) are strongly encouraged and considered upon request from qualified candidates. To request a virtual interview, please email your interview request to Dr. Bentley at rbentley@purdue.edu by January 11. The faculty will review your completed VIRMP application and will then determine whether an interview will be arranged.

The College of Veterinary Medicine at Purdue University values, nurtures, and respects all members of its community and ensures an environment of inclusive excellence where all students, faculty, and staff are inspired and empowered to achieve their full potential. Purdue University is an EOE/AA employer fully committed to achieving a diverse work force. All individuals, including minorities, women, individuals with disabilities and protected veterans are encouraged to apply.

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Radiation Oncology

The Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Purdue University invites applications to the Radiation Oncology Residency Program. This 3-year training program is designed to provide advanced training in veterinary radiation oncology, to prepare the resident for ACVR specialty board certification in Radiation Oncology, and to allow the resident time to develop research projects and publications.  Training includes linear accelerator-based conformal 3D radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT); comprehensive radiation biology and radiation oncology physics and cancer biology courses; imaging techniques (radiography, CT, MRI, US) and interpretation for diagnosis, staging, treatment planning and follow-up; and patient assessment and client communication.  This program includes course work, rounds and seminars though the Purdue College of Veterinary Medicine, the Radiological Health Sciences Department, and the Purdue University/NCI Center for Cancer Research, all located on the Purdue West Lafayette campus.  The program is supported by one radiation therapist (RTT) and two veterinary nurses (RVT).  A part-time medical physicist provides linac quality assurance, treatment planning support and resident training.

Responsibilities of the Radiation Oncology resident include providing compassionate patient and client care, developing and implementing radiation treatment plans under the supervision of a faculty member, and participation in rounds and seminars as scheduled by the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences.  Residents are expected to participate in the clinical teaching of interns, veterinary students and veterinary nursing students and a commitment to further development of their teaching skills is expected.  Radiation oncology residents will present at least one seminar each year to the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences and may also be asked to present a small number of didactic lectures.  The majority of the clinical segment will be spent in the radiation oncology service and the majority of the caseload seen by the resident will be radiation oncology referrals.  The resident will also rotate through the medical oncology service and the diagnostic imaging service.  Rotations through other services may be permitted as well.  In addition to clinical training and responsibilities, residents will have the opportunity to develop clinical research techniques, writing skills and lecture preparation/delivery skills.  Involvement in a clinical, translational, or fundamental research project under the supervision of a senior faculty member is required.  Publication of the research findings in a refereed scientific journal is expected, and the manuscript must be submitted for publication before a residency certificate will be granted.  Residents are required to enroll in the department Clinical and Translational Research Master of Science degree program. The M.S. graduate program (thesis or non-thesis option) is designed to develop the resident's ability to conduct clinical and translational research and augments the residency program. This 3-year residency can lead into the optional Clinical Investigator Program that combines training in radiation oncology with additional course work and basic research experience.  Candidates interested in pursuing a PhD may, with the agreement of the faculty mentor, enroll in the Clinical Investigator Program, which provides advanced training in clinical or fundamental research.  The Clinical Investigator Program integrates residency training with research, and requires graduate study and laboratory experience beyond the first three years.  The Clinical Investigator Program is a flexible, individualized course of study tailored to the career objective of the candidate and contingent upon available funded research capabilities of the department, college, university and affiliated research centers.  Candidates for the Clinical Investigator Program will earn a PhD degree in addition to preparing for board certification.  Purdue University provides a very rich environment for anyone interested in oncological sciences.

Appointments will be made for 12 months with annual renewal based on satisfactory completion of the previous year.  A certificate of residency is awarded to the candidate upon successful completion of the training program.

Employment is on an annual basis with continuation in the program dependent upon satisfactory periodic evaluations. For additional information, contact Dr. Jeannie Plantenga at jmp@purdue.edu.  Telephone (765) 494-1107.

www.vet.purdue.edu/radiationoncology/

Purdue University’s College of Veterinary Medicine is committed to advancing diversity in all areas of scholarship, instruction, and engagement.  The College of Veterinary Medicine values, nurtures, and respects all members of its community and ensures an environment of inclusive excellence where all students, faculty, and staff are inspired and empowered to achieve their full potential. Purdue University is an EOE/AA employer fully committed to achieving a diverse work force.  All individuals, including minorities, women, individuals with disabilities and protected veterans are encouraged to apply.

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Small Animal Internal Medicine

The Small Animal Internal Medicine Residency at Purdue University is a three-year program providing advanced training in internal medicine that meets or exceeds the training requirements outlined by the ACVIM for board certification. The majority of the three-year program is spent on the small animal internal medicine service directly supervised by board-certified diplomates in internal medicine. The caseload consists primarily of referrals from clinics throughout Indiana and surrounding states and referrals from our after-hours emergency service. The current small animal internal medicine faculty and their areas of interest are:

This three-year program provides advanced clinical training that prepares the candidate for academia or private specialty practice. Clinical training and board preparation are supported through daily resident-faculty rounds and a weekly Small Animal Internal Medicine journal club. Additionally, faculty-led board preparation didactic sessions assist our residents in successfully achieving ACVIM certification. The case load at Purdue University’s College of Veterinary Medicine is diverse with particular emphasis in the areas of endocrinology, gastroenterology, infectious disease, nephrology, urology, and immune-mediated diseases. Internal medicine residents will become proficient in advanced medicine diagnostic techniques including but not limited to bronchoscopy, GI endoscopy, cystoscopy, and rhinoscopy. Residents will also have the opportunity to develop their skills in interventional endoscopy, interpretation of CT and MRI, and diagnostic ultrasound. Interaction with ancillary laboratories and services, including clinical pathology and diagnostic imaging (which offers digital radiography, ultrasonography, MRI, CT, and nuclear medicine) are a daily part of resident training. Advanced techniques available at Purdue include use of the Alicam®, I-131 treatment for feline hyperthyroidism, continuous glucose monitoring, nasopharyngeal and tracheal stent placement, laser and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, intermittent hemodialysis for managing AKI and intoxications, molecular diagnosis of infectious disease, and minimally invasive interventional urology. Specialty rotations included in the training of all small animal medicine residents include, but are not limited to, diagnostic imaging, clinical pathology, cardiology, oncology, neurology, and emergency/critical care. Optional rotations include ophthalmology, dermatology, behavior, and radiation oncology, or alternatively, with approval of the resident’s mentor and department head, this time may be used for supervised training at other institutions or specialty practices which provide additional opportunities not available at Purdue.

In addition to clinical training and responsibilities, residents will develop clinical research techniques, writing skills and lecture preparation/delivery skills. Involvement in a clinical, translational, or laboratory research project under the supervision of a senior faculty member is required. Publication of research findings in a refereed scientific journal is expected, and the manuscript must be submitted for publication before a residency certificate will be granted. Residents develop skills necessary for presenting research-based material on a national level through annual participation in a college-wide seminar series. Residents also actively participate in Internal Medicine-based pre-clinical lectures and laboratories in the DVM and veterinary nursing curriculum. Residents also serve as facilitators in Purdue’s problem-based learning curriculum, and lead clinical rotation student rounds to develop their instructional abilities. Residents are required to enroll in the department Clinical and Translational Research Master of Science (thesis or non-thesis) degree program (http://www.vet.purdue.edu/vcs/vcsgradprogram/index.php). This program is designed to develop residents’ ability to conduct clinical and translational research.

Some residents may bypass this requirement if they already have a Ph.D. degree and bypass is approved by the department head. Candidates interested in pursuing a Ph.D. may, with the agreement of faculty mentor(s), enroll in the Clinical Investigator Program. The Clinical Investigator Program strives to integrate residency training with research and requires graduate study and laboratory experience beyond a three-year clinical residency. This program is a flexible, individualized course of study tailored to the career objective of the candidate and is contingent upon available funded research capabilities of the department, college, university and affiliated research centers.

Purdue University’s College of Veterinary Medicine is committed to advancing diversity in all areas of scholarship, instruction, and engagement. The College of Veterinary Medicine values, nurtures, and respects all members of its community and ensures an environment of inclusive excellence where all students, faculty, and staff are inspired and empowered to achieve their full potential. Purdue University is an EOE/AA employer. All individuals, including minorities, women, individuals with disabilities and veterans are encouraged to apply.

For additional information, contact: Dr. Lynn Guptill, Purdue SAIM Residency Program Director, guptillc@purdue.edu.

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Small Animal Internal Medicine (externally funded)

The Small Animal Internal Medicine Residency sponsored by MedVet at Purdue University is a three-year program providing advanced training in internal medicine that meets or exceeds the training requirements outlined by the ACVIM for board certification. The resident will have a post-residency employment commitment at a MedVet hospital. MedVet is a large private specialty practice group in the U.S. and is currently made up of 30 veterinarian-owned and managed emergency and multi-specialty hospitals located across 15 states.  While residency training will be based at Purdue, there can be time available in the 2nd and 3rd year (up to 4 weeks/year) for clinical rotations at MedVet hospitals.

The majority of the three-year program is spent on the small animal internal medicine service directly supervised by board-certified diplomates in internal medicine. The caseload consists primarily of referrals from clinics throughout Indiana and surrounding states and referrals from our after-hours emergency service. The current small animal internal medicine faculty and their areas of interest are:

This three-year program provides advanced clinical training that prepares the candidate for academia or private specialty practice. Clinical training and board preparation are supported through daily resident-faculty rounds and a weekly Small Animal Internal Medicine journal club. Additionally, faculty-led board preparation didactic sessions assist our residents in successfully achieving ACVIM certification. The case load at Purdue University’s College of Veterinary Medicine is diverse with particular emphasis in the areas of endocrinology, gastroenterology, infectious disease, nephrology, urology, and immune-mediated diseases. Internal medicine residents will become proficient in advanced medicine diagnostic techniques including but not limited to bronchoscopy, GI endoscopy, cystoscopy, and rhinoscopy. Residents will also have the opportunity to develop their skills in interventional endoscopy, interpretation of CT and MRI, and diagnostic ultrasound. Interaction with ancillary laboratories and services, including clinical pathology and diagnostic imaging (which offers digital radiography, ultrasonography, MRI, CT, and nuclear medicine) are a daily part of resident training. Advanced techniques available at Purdue include use of the Alicam®, I-131 treatment for feline hyperthyroidism, continuous glucose monitoring, nasopharyngeal and tracheal stent placement, laser and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, intermittent hemodialysis for managing AKI and intoxications, molecular diagnosis of infectious disease, and minimally invasive interventional urology. Specialty rotations included in the training of all small animal medicine residents include, but are not limited to, diagnostic imaging, clinical pathology, cardiology, oncology, neurology, and emergency/critical care. Optional rotations include ophthalmology, dermatology, behavior, and radiation oncology, or alternatively, with approval of the resident’s mentor and department head, this time may be used for supervised training at other institutions or specialty practices which provide additional opportunities not available at Purdue.

In addition to clinical training and responsibilities, residents will develop clinical research techniques, writing skills and lecture preparation/delivery skills. Involvement in a clinical, translational, or laboratory research project under the supervision of a senior faculty member is required. Publication of research findings in a refereed scientific journal is expected, and the manuscript must be submitted for publication before a residency certificate will be granted. Residents develop skills necessary for presenting research-based material on a national level through annual participation in a college-wide seminar series. Residents also actively participate in Internal Medicine-based pre-clinical lectures and laboratories in the DVM and veterinary nursing curriculum. Residents also serve as facilitators in Purdue’s problem-based learning curriculum, and lead clinical rotation student rounds to develop their instructional abilities. Residents are required to enroll in the department Clinical and Translational Research Master of Science (thesis or non-thesis) degree program (http://www.vet.purdue.edu/vcs/vcsgradprogram/index.php). This program is designed to develop residents’ ability to conduct clinical and translational research. Some residents may bypass this requirement if they already have a Ph.D. degree and bypass is approved by the department head.

Interviews are required and should be requested by interested candidates. The Purdue small animal internal medicine faculty will review your completed application and determine whether an interview will be arranged. Interview notification will be emailed by mid-January 2021 and virtual interviews will be conducted during late January 2021, or early February 2021, as time allows. In addition to interviewing with Purdue faculty, a separate virtual interview will be arranged with MedVet representatives to discuss the position, sponsoring and terms of the post-residency employment commitment.

Contact MedVet Director of Post-Graduate Medical Education, Dr Jon Fletcher, (jon.fletcher@medvet.com), for additional information about MedVet and the post-residency employment commitment.

Purdue University’s College of Veterinary Medicine is committed to advancing diversity in all areas of scholarship, instruction, and engagement. The College of Veterinary Medicine values, nurtures, and respects all members of its community and ensures an environment of inclusive excellence where all students, faculty, and staff are inspired and empowered to achieve their full potential. Purdue University is an EOE/AA employer. All individuals, including minorities, women, individuals with disabilities and veterans are encouraged to apply.

For additional information, contact: Dr. Lynn Guptill, Purdue SAIM Residency Program Director, guptillc@purdue.edu.

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Small Animal Surgery

The Small Animal Surgery Residency at Purdue University is a three-year program that provides advanced training in small animal surgery and satisfies the ACVS residency requirements.

Residents rotate between the orthopedic surgery and soft tissue surgery services, as well as periodic rotations through the neurology/neurosurgery service. Residents manage patients under the direct supervision of faculty. Surgery faculty in direct clinical support of the program are: Drs. Sun Kim (Orthopedic Surgery), Sarah Malek (Orthopedic Surgery), Jessica Ogden (Soft Tissue Surgery), Marije Risselada (Soft Tissue surgery, Program Director), Mark Rochat (Orthopedic surgery, Section Chief), Allyson Sterman (Soft Tissue Surgery).

For a portion of the third year, the chief resident, with faculty support, may be in charge of the orthopedic and soft tissue surgery services, pending satisfactory semi-annual evaluations. Residents participate in the surgical emergency duty rotation for soft tissue, orthopedic and neurosurgical cases on a rotating basis and are financially compensated for after-hours emergency cases. The surgery services see a busy and diverse referral surgical caseload and are extremely well equipped with state-of-the-art equipment. The surgery services interact closely with other hospital services such as anesthesia, emergency and critical care, internal medicine, cardiology, urology, diagnostic imaging, radiation oncology, and medical oncology; each offering a wide array of expertise in diagnostic and treatment capabilities. Surgery residents participate in several didactic activities including: daily service rounds, weekly journal clubs, surgical M&M rounds, pathology rounds, oncology rounds, house officer seminars, hands on skills labs (at least 9/year on various surgical areas) and quarterly mock exams. Scheduling will allow attendance of outside courses (MIS, AO). ACVS attendance during the third year is highly encouraged. Each resident receives a set amount of financial support that can be used to purchase loupes, attend courses or conferences.

In addition to clinical training and responsibilities, residents will have the opportunity to develop clinical research techniques, writing skills, lecture preparation and delivery skills. Involvement in a clinical, translational, or fundamental research project under the supervision of a faculty member is required. Publication of the research findings in a refereed scientific journal is expected, and the manuscript must be submitted for publication before a residency certificate will be granted. Residents are expected to give at least two presentations each year as part of the ACVS residency seminar requirements. Residents are expected to participate in the clinical teaching of junior residents, interns, veterinary students and veterinary nursing students and a commitment to further development of their teaching skills is expected. Residents are required to enroll in the department Clinical and Translational Research Master of Science degree program (http://www.vet.purdue.edu/vcs/vcsgradprogram/index.php) unless they already have a post-graduate degree and non-enrollment is approved by the department head. Employment is on an annual basis, with continuation in the program dependent upon favorable biannual evaluations.

Applicants should follow the AAVC application instructions to submit: 1) a completed AAVC application form, 2) complete curriculum vitae, 3) brief letter of intent, 4) veterinary college transcript and 5) three letters of recommendation from faculty and/or employers familiar with the candidate’s background, clinical knowledge and skills. Candidates who have graduated from AVMA-accredited programs or those from non-accredited programs that have fulfilled the ECFVG or PAVE requirements will be given preference but all are encouraged to apply.

Interviews are required and by invitation only. In order to be considered for an interview, the completed AAVC application, including letters of recommendation, must be submitted on time. The Purdue surgery faculty will review your completed application and determine whether an interview will be arranged. Interview notification will be emailed by mid-January 2021 and virtual interviews (Zoom, Skype or similar) will be conducted during the end of January 2021, or first weeks of February 2021, as time allows.

The Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine values, nurtures, and respects all members of its community and ensures an environment of inclusive excellence where all students, faculty, and staff are inspired and empowered to achieve their full potential. Purdue University is an EOE/AA employer fully committed to achieving a diverse work force. All individuals, including minorities, women, individuals with disabilities and veterans are encouraged to apply.

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Small Animal Surgery (externally funded)

The Small Animal Surgery Residency at Purdue University is a three-year program that is designed to provide broad advanced training in small animal surgery and to satisfy the ACVS residency requirements. Financial support for this residency position will be provided by MedVet (http://www.medvetforpets.com/). The candidate selected for this residency position will have a post-residency employment commitment at a MedVet hospital. MedVet is one of the largest private specialty practices in the country and is made up of 30 veterinarian-owned and led emergency and multi-specialty hospitals located across 15 states. The Director of Post-Graduate Medical Education, Dr Jon Fletcher, should be contacted (jon.fletcher@medvet.com) for additional information about MedVet and the post-residency employment commitment. Although the majority of the training completed during this residency will occur at Purdue, up to 4 weeks per year of the second and third years of residency training will be completed at a MedVet hospital location. 

Residents rotate between the orthopedic surgery and soft tissue surgery services as well as the neurology/neurosurgery service. Residents manage patients under the direct supervision of faculty. Surgery faculty in direct clinical support of the program are: Drs Sun Kim (Orthopedic Surgery), Sarah Malek (Orthopedic Surgery), Jessica Ogden (Soft Tissue Surgery), Marije Risselada (Soft Tissue surgery, Program Director), Mark Rochat (Orthopedic surgery, Section Chief), Allyson Sterman (Soft Tissue Surgery).

For a portion of the third year, the chief resident, with faculty backup, will be in charge of the orthopedic and soft tissue surgery services, pending satisfactory semi-annual evaluations. The resident will participate in the surgical emergency duty rotation for soft tissue, orthopedic and neurosurgical cases throughout the program, and will be compensated for seeing after-hours emergency cases. The clinical aspect of the residency is supported by a diverse referral surgical caseload and other hospital services such as anesthesia, internal medicine, critical care, cardiology, imaging, radiation oncology and medical oncology; each offering a wide array of expertise in diagnostic and treatment capabilities. Surgery residents participate in several didactic activities including: daily service rounds, weekly journal clubs, surgical M&M rounds, pathology rounds, oncology rounds, house officer seminars, hands on skills labs (at least 9/year on various surgical areas) and quarterly mock exams. Scheduling will allow attendance of outside courses (MIS, AO). ACVS attendance during the third year is highly encouraged. A set amount of financial support will be provided by MedVet to purchase loupes, attend courses or conferences.

In addition to clinical training and responsibilities, residents will have the opportunity to develop clinical research techniques, writing skills, and lecture preparation/delivery skills. Involvement in a clinical, translational, or fundamental research project under the supervision of a faculty member is required. Publication of the research findings in a refereed scientific journal is expected, and the manuscript must be submitted for publication before a residency certificate will be granted. Residents are expected to give at least two presentations each year as part of the ACVS residency seminar requirements. Residents are expected to participate in the clinical teaching of junior residents, interns, veterinary students and veterinary nursing students and a commitment to further development of their teaching skills is expected. Residents are required to enroll in the department Clinical and Translational Research Master of Science degree program (http://www.vet.purdue.edu/vcs/vcsgradprogram/index.php) unless they already have a post-graduate degree and non-enrollment is approved by the department head. 

Employment is on an annual basis, with continuation in the program dependent upon favorable biannual evaluations. In case of egregious events, procedures for immediate dismissal might be started according to Purdue HR guidelines.

Applicants should follow the AAVC application instructions to produce a: 1) completed AAVC application form, 2) complete curriculum vitae, 3) brief letter of intent, 4) veterinary college transcript and 5) request for three letters of recommendation from faculty and/or employers familiar with the candidate’s background, clinical knowledge and skills. Only candidates graduated from AVMA-accredited programs or those from non-accredited programs that have fulfilled the ECFVG or PAVE requirements will be considered.

Interviews are required and by invitation only. In order to be considered for an interview, the AAVC application, including letters of recommendation, must be submitted on time. The Purdue surgery faculty will review your completed application and determine whether an interview will be arranged. Interview notification will be emailed by mid-January 2021 and virtual interviews (Zoom, Skype or similar) will be conducted during the end of January 2021, or first weeks of February 2021, as time allows. In addition to interviewing with Purdue faculty, a separate virtual discussion will be arranged with MedVet representatives to discuss the position, sponsoring and terms of the post-residency employment commitment. Both MedVet and the Purdue Small Animal Surgery Service will participate in the evaluation of candidates applying for the residency position.

The Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine values, nurtures, and respects all members of its community and ensures an environment of inclusive excellence where all students, faculty, and staff are inspired and empowered to achieve their full potential. Purdue University is an EOE/AA employer fully committed to achieving a diverse work force. All individuals, including minorities, women, individuals with disabilities and veterans are encouraged to apply.

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Large Animal Residencies

Large Animal Internal Medicine

The overall goal of the residency program is to provide training and experience to qualify the candidate for certification by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM). This program is approved by ACVIM, follows the Certification Manual (CM) and General Information Guide (GIG) from ACVIM for training residents (www.ACVIM.org), and is directed by four LAIM Diplomats of ACVIM. There are a total of three LAIM medicine residents and three Large Animal Surgery residents in the Large Animal Hospital.

The annual total “in house” large animal caseload is over 2300 animals/year, and is comprised of approximately 60% horses, 39% “food and fiber” including camelids, and 1% exotic hoof stock. Of the total “in house” hospital caseload, approximately 33% of the cases are assigned exclusively to the LAIM service.

The majority of this three-year program will be spent in the internal medicine service working with four board-certified specialists and two other LAIM residents. Residents participate in the after-hours emergency schedule along with the other medical and surgical residents, and will receive additional compensation for time spent seeing emergency cases. The majority of the caseload seen by the resident will be referrals with the remainder comprising primary care visits from local clients.

Residents will have the opportunity to become proficient in advanced diagnostics including endoscopy, ultrasound, lung function testing, equine sports medicine, and biopsy techniques. Daily exposure to ancillary laboratories and services including clinical pathology and diagnostic imaging (radiography, ultrasonography, scintigraphy, CT, MRI) and interaction with board-certified Diplomats of many different disciplines will help round out the training of the resident. Time off clinics to allow for preparation for board certification in LAIM is provided. In the past five years, three candidates have completed the residency program. To date, two have received ACVIM certification.

While most of the time will be spent in the medicine service, options for specialty rotations include: clinical pathology, radiology, ophthalmology, herd health, diagnostic pathology, and neurology, among others. Depending upon the residents' interests, out-rotations to other academic institutions or specialist practices which provide additional opportunities not available at Purdue may be arranged with approval of the resident’s mentor and Department Head.

In addition to clinical training and responsibilities, residents will have the opportunity to develop clinical research expertise, scientific writing skills and lecture preparation/delivery skills. Involvement in a clinical, translational, or fundamental research project under the supervision of a senior faculty member is required. Publication of research findings in a refereed scientific journal is expected, and the manuscript must be submitted for publication before a residency certificate will be granted. Residents are expected to present one seminar each year to the department and may also be required to present a small number of didactic lectures and/or laboratories. Residents are expected to participate in the clinical teaching of veterinary students and veterinary technician students, and a commitment to further development of their teaching skills is expected.

Residents are required to enroll in the department Clinical and Translational Research Master of Science (M.S.) degree program unless they already have a post-graduate degree and non-enrollment is approved by the Department Head. To meet this end, applicants must also enroll in the Graduate School and tuition fees will be assessed.

The M.S. graduate program (thesis or non-thesis option) is designed to develop the resident's ability to conduct clinical and translational research and augment the residency program. The primary goal of the advanced degree program is to prepare residents for a successful career in academia, research, specialty clinical practice, government, or industry. By the end of the program, residents will be able to: (1) understand the scientific method; 2) effectively communicate in their field of study; (3) think critically and creatively about problems in their field of study; and (4) conduct their activities in an ethical and responsible manner. Candidates interested in pursuing a Ph.D. may, with the agreement of their faculty mentor(s), enroll in a combined post-DVM residency/Ph.D. program. For additional information, please visit the VCS Graduate Program web site: http://www.vet.purdue.edu/vcs/vcsgradprogram/.

The three-year residency program will begin July 15, 2021 and will end July 15, 2024. Minimum qualifications include graduation from an AVMA listed College of Veterinary Medicine, and one year spent in a rotating internship or equivalent practice experience. International candidates are invited to apply. Non-English speakers should submit TOEFL scores or other evidence of English written and verbal ability.

Salary is $31,500 per year. Compensation for emergency cases seen provides additional revenue, and ranges from $500 to $4,000 per year. Additionally, departmental and Large Animal Internal Medicine section funds are available to support travel to scientific meetings.

Out-of-pocket fees required of residents include Graduate School fees, health insurance, and parking. Health insurance and parking can be paid as payroll deduction. Health insurance through Purdue University is not required if the resident can provide proof of insurance elsewhere. Residents receive 11 days of vacation and 11 days of sick leave per year.

For more information about the Large Animal Internal Medicine Residency, contact Dr. Janice Kritchevsky, 765-494-8548 or sojkaje@purdue.edu. Interested candidates are encouraged to schedule a meeting with the section faculty via Skype or Zoom conferencing. Please contact Dr. Kritchevsky to schedule a time.

Purdue University’s College of Veterinary Medicine is committed to advancing diversity in all areas of scholarship, instruction, and engagement. The Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine values, nurtures, and respects all members of its community and ensures an environment of inclusive excellence where all students, faculty, and staff are inspired and empowered to achieve their full potential. Purdue University is an EOE/AA employer fully committed to achieving a diverse work force. All individuals, including minorities, women, individuals with disabilities and veterans are encouraged to apply.

More information about Purdue’s Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences and Teaching Hospital can be found at: https://vet.purdue.edu/vcs/index.php and http://vet.purdue.edu/vth/index.php

For all candidates, it is important to note that the program described herein has been approved by the ACVIM, however the ACVIM only has jurisdiction over the assurance of the institution’s ability to attain minimal standards as set by the ACVIM for board certification. The sponsoring institution provides funding for the position and therefore residency training programs approved by the ACVIM are not transferrable to other institutions. Further details on the ACVIM approved programs can be obtained at: https://www.acvim.org/Admin/Approved-Residency-Training-Programs.

Additional fees for board certification are required by the ACVIM and for 202-2022 include: Candidate registration: $295; General Exam: $925 new and $635 retake; Credentials: $545; Specialty Examination: $1340 new and $995 retake.

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Large Animal Surgery

The large animal surgical residency at Purdue University is a three-year clinical program providing advanced training in surgery that meets or exceeds the training requirements outlined by the American College of Veterinary Surgeons (ACVS). To review the ACVS residency requirements visit http://www.acvs.org. The majority of the three-year program will be spent in the large animal surgical service working with four board certified specialists in large animal surgery. The case load is diverse with a variety of large animal species being treated. We have experienced no problems in reaching the minimum case requirements set forth by the ACVS. Horses make up approximately 75% of the case load and include horses involved in racing (Thoroughbred and Standardbred), western performance, dressage, and jumping. Food animals constitute roughly 20% of the case load and camelids and other species (pigs and exotics) making up the final 5% of cases admitted to the large animal hospital. The large animal surgical faculty have special interests in orthopedic, gastrointestinal, upper respiratory, lasers, and food animal/camelid surgery. Surgical residents will become proficient in advanced diagnostic techniques including: lameness evaluation, diagnostic imaging (digital radiography, computed tomography, MRI, and nuclear scintigraphy), and laparoscopy. Daily exposure to ancillary laboratories and services including large animal internal medicine (4 ACVIM diplomats), diagnostic imaging, and clinical pathology. The following equipment is available for diagnostic and therapeutic use: video endoscopy, fluoroscopy, shock wave lithotripsy, carbon dioxide and diode lasers, laparoscopy, high speed treadmill, and locking plate application capability. It is the intent of the three year program to provide advanced clinical training that will enable the candidate to be qualified for either academic or private specialty practice. Specialty rotations include radiology, pathology, anesthesia, and internal medicine. Large animal surgical residents function as a team consisting of senior faculty, fellow residents, technicians, and senior veterinary students. Residents are expected to share emergency responsibilities with fellow house officers (large animal surgical and internal medicine residents). Third year surgical residents, pending satisfactory completion of the first two years of their program, function as primary emergency surgeons and have primary case responsibility.

In addition to clinical training and responsibilities, residents will have ample opportunity to develop clinical research techniques, writing skills, and lecture preparation/delivery skills. Involvement in a clinical, translational, or fundamental research project under the supervision of a senior faculty member (resident advisor) is required. The resident advisor must be chosen within the first month of the residency program. Publication of the research findings in a referred scientific journal (on the approved journal list of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons) is expected, and the manuscript must be accepted for publication before a residency certificate will be granted. Residents are expected to present one seminar each year to the department and may also be required to present a small number of didactic lectures. Residents are expected to participate in the clinical teaching of senior students, and veterinary nursing students and a commitment to further development of their teaching skills is expected. Residents are required to enroll in the Department’s Clinical and Translational Research Master of Science degree program (http://www.vet.purdue.edu/vcs/vcsgradprogram/index.php) unless they already have a post-graduate degree and non-enrollment is approved by the department head. The M.S. graduate program (thesis or non-thesis option) is designed to develop the resident's ability to conduct clinical and translational research and augments the residency program. Candidates interested in pursuing a PhD may, with the agreement of the resident advisor, enroll in the Clinical Investigator Program, which is designed to develop the capability to conduct clinical or basic research, often in collaboration with researchers in non-clinical departments within the College of Veterinary Medicine. The program strives to integrate residency training with research, and requires graduate study and laboratory experience beyond the first three years. This program is a flexible, individualized course of study tailored to the career objective of the candidate and contingent upon available funded research capabilities of the department, college, university, and affiliated research centers.

Because of travel restrictions secondary to COVID-19, in person visits will not be allowed this year.  We strongly recommend that all candidates interested in this residency position arrange a video conference prior to the deadline for application to the VIRMP.  . Please contact Dr. Jan Hawkins to arrange a video conference. Telephone:  765-494-8563, email: hawkinsj@purdue.edu.

The Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine values, nurtures, and respects all members of its community and ensures an environment of inclusive excellence where all students, faculty, and staff are inspired and empowered to achieve their full potential. Purdue University is an EOE/AA employer fully committed to achieving a diverse work force. All individuals, including minorities, women, individuals with disabilities and veterans are encouraged to apply.

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Internships

Neurology Internship

The Neurology Internship at Purdue University is a 12.5-month clinical program (0.5 month orientation and 12 months clinical training) designed to provide advanced training in neurology and neurosurgery, and to prepare the intern for a neurology residency.  Applicants must have successfully completed a small animal rotating internship to be considered.

The intern will participate in clinical rotations and assume primary responsibility for small animal patients.  Large animal patients are examined on a consultation basis.  The intern will participate in the neurological/neurosurgical emergency duty on a rotating basis among the neurology and small animal surgery residents.  The majority of time will be spent on clinical neurology/neurosurgery rotations.Some time may be spent on rotations outside of neurology.  Opportunities will exist to pursue a research project under faculty mentorship.

The current small animal neurology faculty consists of three permanent faculty members.  Respective clinical areas and research/special interests include:

Timothy Bentley, BVSc, MRCVS, DACVIM (Neurology); Clinical Area: medical neurology and neurosurgery; Research: brain tumors and hydrocephalus

Melissa Lewis, VMD, PhD, DACVIM (Neurology); Clinical Area: medical neurology and neurosurgery; Research: spinal cord injury, electrophysiology and neuroradiology

Stephanie Thomovsky, DVM, MS, DACVIM (Neurology), CCRP, cVMA; Clinical Area: medical neurology, neurosurgery and physical rehabilitation; Research: rehabilitation of the post-operative neurologic patient, paroxysmal dyskinesias, seizure management

The neurology service is part of the small animal surgery section and is strongly supported by the surgery faculty.  Purdue University Veterinary Teaching Hospital is a well-equipped, multi-disciplinary veterinary referral hospital. Clinical facilities include fully-equipped surgical suites for spinal and intracranial procedures, minimally-invasive surgical equipment, electrodiagnostic capabilities, fully-equipped rehabilitation suite including underwater treadmill. Advanced diagnostic imaging facilities on-site include 1.5T MRI, 64-slice CT scanner, fluoroscopy and nuclear medicine.  An in-house linear accelerator is available for radiation therapy.  A new state-of-the-art teaching hospital is expected to open in March 2022. Additional diagnostic modalities on campus include 3.0T MRI.  Currently areas of ongoing research include canine brain tumors, spinal cord injury and neurologic rehabilitation.                                                                                        

The intern is expected to attend and present during weekly journal club and resident rounds on a rotational basis, and will present one 50 minute seminar to the department during the internship. The intern will also participate in the clinical teaching of veterinary students and veterinary technician students.

Each intern is assigned a mentor who provides guidance and serves as a liaison throughout the program. Performance reviews will be conducted every 6 months.  A certificate will be awarded upon satisfactory completion of the program.  Benefits include 22 days of vacation, health insurance, and professional liability insurance.

Applicants should submit a completed VIRMP application, veterinary school official transcript from University registrar, curriculum vitae, a letter of intent, veterinary college transcript and three to four standardized letters of reference from faculty or employers familiar with the candidate’s clinical knowledge and skills.

Indiana licensure is not required for participation in this program; however, due to length of time to obtain international visas, you must be a citizen of the United States or possess permanent residency status at the time of application.

Virtual interviews (video call) are strongly encouraged and considered upon request from qualified candidates. To request a virtual interview, please email your interview request to Dr. Bentley at rbentley@purdue.edu by January 11. The faculty will review your completed VIRMP application and will then determine whether an interview will be arranged.

The College of Veterinary Medicine at Purdue University values, nurtures, and respects all members of its community and ensures an environment of inclusive excellence where all students, faculty, and staff are inspired and empowered to achieve their full potential. Purdue University is an EOE/AA employer fully committed to achieving a diverse work force. All individuals, including minorities, women, individuals with disabilities and protected veterans are encouraged to apply.

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Small Animal Rotating Internship

The small animal rotating internship at Purdue University is a 12.5-month clinical program (0.5 month orientation and 12 months clinical training) providing advanced clinical training in medicine, surgery, emergency medicine, and other specialties on an elective basis. The program is designed to qualify the individual for entry into an approved residency program leading to board certification in a recognized veterinary specialty.


Under the direct guidance and supervision of senior faculty members each intern will work a minimum of 12 weeks in internal medicine and surgery respectively, and 9-12 weeks of electives. Elective options allow for clinical experience in other specialties within the hospital as well as further experience in the core rotations (internal medicine, surgery, and emergency medicine). Elective options include anesthesia, cardiology, clinical pathology, community practice (wellness clinic and exotics), dermatology, diagnostic imaging, emergency critical care, neurology, oncology, ophthalmology, physical therapy/rehabilitation, and radiation oncology. Approximately 12 weeks will be spent on emergency duty – time is spent on day or night time services. Interns are required to remain in the hospital overnight when on night emergency duty during which time each intern will be responsible for both referral and walk-in emergency cases with the support of the emergency and critical care residents, emergency doctors on duty as well as the support from other specialty service residents and faculty clinicians on-call. The intern will also be expected to help with critical cases in the small animal intensive care unit. Presentation of one 50-minute seminar to an audience of faculty, house officers, and students is required. Submission of article manuscript for publication in a scientific journal is strongly recommended but not required. Interns are expected to attend weekly one hour lectures specifically tailored for interns and participate in journal and book club activities on a regular basis.

Each intern is assigned a mentor who provides guidance and serves as a liaison throughout the program. A certificate will be awarded upon satisfactory completion of the program. Benefits include 22 days of vacation, health insurance, and professional liability insurance. Indiana licensure is not required for participation in this program; however, due to length of time to obtain international visas, you must be a citizen of the United States or possess permanent residency status at the time of application to qualify for this position.

For additional information, contact: Dr. Paula A. Johnson, Chair, Intern Committee. Telephone: (765) 494-8562 or (765) 494-1107, email: johns357@purdue.edu

Purdue University’s College of Veterinary Medicine is committed to advancing diversity in all areas of scholarship, instruction, and engagement. The College of Veterinary Medicine values, nurtures, and respects all members of its community and ensures an environment of inclusive excellence where all students, faculty, and staff are inspired and empowered to achieve their full potential. Purdue University is an EOE/AA employer. All individuals, including minorities, women, individuals with disabilities and protected veterans are encouraged to apply.

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Small Animal Rotating Internship, Diversity

The small animal rotating internship at Purdue University is a 12.5-month clinical program (0.5 month orientation and 12 months clinical training) providing advanced clinical training in medicine, surgery, emergency medicine, and other specialties on an elective basis. The program is designed to qualify the individual for entry into an approved residency program leading to board certification in a recognized veterinary specialty. Applicants applying for this position are required to provide a statement in their cover letter addressing how they would provide diversity to veterinary medicine and why they should be considered for the diversity position. Alternatively, this can be provided in a separate letter and sent to the email address given below.

Under the direct guidance and supervision of senior faculty members each intern will work a minimum of 12 weeks in internal medicine and surgery respectively, and 9-12 weeks of electives. Elective options allow for clinical experience in other specialties within the hospital as well as further experience in the core rotations (internal medicine, surgery, and emergency medicine). Elective options include anesthesia, cardiology, clinical pathology, community practice (wellness clinic and exotics), dermatology, diagnostic imaging, emergency critical care, neurology, oncology, ophthalmology, physical therapy/rehabilitation, and radiation oncology. Approximately 12 weeks will be spent on emergency duty – time is spent on day or night time services. Interns are required to remain in the hospital overnight when on night emergency duty during which time each intern will be responsible for both referral and walk-in emergency cases with the support of the emergency and critical care residents, emergency doctors on duty as well as the support from other specialty service residents and faculty clinicians on-call. The intern will also be expected to help with critical cases in the small animal intensive care unit. Presentation of one 50-minute seminar to an audience of faculty, house officers, and students is required. Submission of a manuscript for publication in a scientific journal is strongly recommended but not required. Interns are expected to attend a weekly one hour lecture specifically tailored for interns and participate in journal and book club activities on a regular basis.

Each intern is assigned a mentor who provides guidance and serves as a liaison throughout the program. A certificate will be awarded upon satisfactory completion of the program. Benefits include 22 days of vacation, health insurance, and professional liability insurance.. Indiana licensure is not required for participation in this program; however, due to the length of time to obtain international visas, you must be a citizen of the United States or possess permanent residency status at the time of application to qualify for this position.

For additional information, contact: Dr. Paula A. Johnson, Chair, Intern Committee. Telephone: (765) 494-8562 or (765) 494-1107, email: johns357@purdue.edu. Address: 625 Harrison Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907.

Purdue University’s College of Veterinary Medicine is committed to advancing diversity in all areas of scholarship, instruction, and engagement. The College of Veterinary Medicine values, nurtures, and respects all members of its community and ensures an environment of inclusive excellence where all students, faculty, and staff are inspired and empowered to achieve their full potential. Purdue University is an EOE/AA employer. All individuals, including minorities, women, individuals with disabilities and protected veterans are encouraged to apply.

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