Purdue Veterinary Medicine Speakers Bureau

Welcome! We understand that selecting the perfect speaker for your event is essential. The Purdue Veterinary Medicine Speakers Bureau was designed to make it easy for event organizers to connect with Purdue Veterinary Medicine faculty and staff to make speaking arrangements. Search by topic and then contact the speaker directly to make arrangements or get additional information.

Continuing Education (CE) Credits: The event organizer is responsible for providing CE credits for the event. Purdue University will not provide CE credits for the presentations below unless the event is delivered by the Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine's Office of Lifelong Learning.

Diagnostic Imaging

Chee Kin Lim, DVM, BVSc (Hons), MMedVet (Diagnostic Imaging), Diplomate European College of Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging

Chee Kin Lim, DVM, BVSc (Hons), MMedVet (Diagnostic Imaging), Diplomate European College of Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging

Email: cklim@purdue.edu

Chee Kin received his DVM from the University Putra Malaysia in 2004, after which he spent 6 years working in a referral small animal practice in Malaysia. He commenced his residency training in veterinary diagnostic imaging at the University of Pretoria, South Africa in 2010. In 2013, he was awarded his post-graduate degree BVSc(Hons) in diagnostic imaging. Upon completion of his residency, he passed both the South African and European veterinary diagnostic imaging specialist examinations, obtaining his MMedVet (Diagnostic Imaging) degree and became a Diplomate of the European College of Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging. He joined Purdue University in 2013 where he is currently a Clinical Assistant Professor in Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging. He is the author of multiple peer reviewed publications. Dr. Lim enjoys lecturing and conducting workshops in radiology and ultrasonography! His clinical and research interests include ultrasonography, echocardiography and CT imaging of trauma in small animals but never tires of looking at radiographs or MRI studies!

Presentations

Vomiting is a common clinical problem in dogs. The vomiting dog is a particularly challenging clinical syndrome, and medical decision making in vomiting can be difficult, especially when resources are limited. Ensure you don’t perform an unnecessary laparotomy and gain confidence to make an effective assessment. Learn how to combine a careful clinical approach using abdominal radiographs and ultrasonography to handle the vomiting dog. This seminar (3 hours) is suitable for private practitioners that are involved in clinical work in dogs. Veterinary nurses, may also find this presentation of use.

Coughing is a common clinical problem in dogs. The coughing dog is a particularly challenging clinical syndrome, and medical decision making in coughing can be difficult, especially when resources are limited. Coughing is often seen in dogs with suspected cardiac disease and differentiating between conditions can be challenging. Learn how to optimize usage of radiography and other adjunct imaging modalities to manage the coughing dog. This seminar (3 hours) is suitable for private practitioners that are involved in clinical work in dogs. Veterinary nurses, may also find this presentation of use.

Abdominal ultrasound has become an integral modality in dealing with small animals presented with abdominal diseases. This is a one-day course aimed at veterinary surgeons who are interested in improving their skills at basic ultrasonography. The day is composed of a mixture of lectures and practical 'hands-on' ultrasonography sessions, with emphasis on exposing the veterinary surgeons to locating and identifying the normal ultrasonographic appearance of the abdominal organs. Topics covered include ultrasound physics, knobology, indications for abdominal ultrasound, artifacts, practical ultrasound of the liver and gall bladder, spleen, kidneys, urinary bladder, gastrointestinal tract, adrenals and lymph nodes.

Abdominal ultrasound has become an integral modality in dealing with small animals presented with abdominal diseases. This is a two-day course aimed at veterinary surgeons who already have prior experience in basic ultrasonography. The day is composed of a mixture of lectures and practical 'hands-on' ultrasonography sessions.The focus of this course is to expand their ability to come up with differential diagnoses for the abnormalities detected on ultrasound. Participants will also be trained on FNA techniques using Jello phantoms.

There will be a total of 8 lectures and 4 Hands-On Labs covering:

  1. Principles, Knobology & Artifact
  2. Hepatobiliary System
  3. Spleen and Peritoneal Cavity
  4. Urinary System
  5. GIT
  6. Reproductive System
  7. Small organs (Pancreas, Adrenals & Lymph nods!)
  8. Interventional procedures - Biopsies & FNAs techniques.

In veterinary medicine, thoracic radiology is still the mainstay for diagnosis of intra- and extra-thoracic diseases. In spite of the omnipresent usage of thoracic radiographs, the thorax remains one of the more challenging areas to interpret. This two-days course is aimed at veterinary surgeons and nurses who worked closely with small animals, with the primary goal of improving their competency in acquiring and interpreting thoracic radiographs of dogs and cats.

Topics covered include:

  1. Choosing the appropriate radiographic views
  2. Knowing your radiographic anatomy
  3. Developing a consistent approach to thoracic interpretation
  4. Familiarizing with the lung patterns and knowing the underlying disease
  5. Recognizing radiological signs of cardiovascular disease. Large number of interesting cases will also be covered during film-reading session.

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Equine

Laurent Couetil, DVM, PhD, Diplomate ACVIM-LAIM

Laurent Couetil, DVM, PhD, Diplomate ACVIM-LAIM

Email: couetill@purdue.edu

Dr. Couetil is a professor of large animal medicine at Purdue University.  He obtained his veterinary degree from the French National Veterinary School of Alfort and then worked several years in equine private practice in France.  Dr. Couetil completed a large animal medicine residency at Tufts University and a PhD in respiratory physiology at the University of Liege, Belgium. He has been a faculty member at Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine since 1995 where he is Director of the Equine Research Program and of the Equine Sports Medicine Center.  Dr. Couetil is the current President of the Large Animal Internal Medicine specialty of the ACVIM. Dr. Couetil's research interest is investigating the causes and treatment of poor performance in athletic horses, in particular Equine Asthma.

Presentations

A mild form of lower airway inflammatory disease commonly encountered in young athletic horses is recognized as a separate entity from recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) and termed IAD. Although clinical manifestation is usually different between RAO and IAD there are similarities in etiology, pathophysiology and therapy. Differentiating RAO and IAD from infectious respiratory diseases may also be challenging.  The purpose of this presentation is to review available data that led to the current understanding of IAD. The goal is to provide equine practitioners with evidence-based information to enable them to make informed decisions concerning the diagnosis and treatment of an individual horse.


Janice Kritchevsky, VMD, MS, DACVIM

Janice Kritchevsky, VMD, MS, DACVIM

Email: sojkaje@purdue.edu

Janice Kritchevsky is a Professor in the department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences at Purdue University. She graduated from Michigan State University with a B.S. degree, received a V.M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, and a M.S. from Purdue University. Dr. Kritchevsky completed a clinical residency in large animal medicine at Purdue University and is a member of the large animal medicine section. She is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine. Her research interests include equine endocrine disease, and she is particularly interested in thyroid and pituitary disorders.

Presentations

This answers common owner questions about PPID (equine Cushing's disease) and equine metabolic syndrome. These are confusing topics with many recommendations. This talk explains how to handle horses with these issues in a practical way.


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Food Animal

Nickie Baird, DVM, MS, DACVS

Nickie Baird, DVM, MS, DACVS

Email: abaird@purdue.edu

Dr. Baird received his undergraduate degree from North Carolina State University.  He completed his DVM at Auburn in 1984. After a year in practice in northern Virginia he moved to Texas A&M University where he completed a rotating internship, a large animal surgery residency and one year on faculty.  He then served on faculty at Auburn University for 8 years and the University of Pennsylvania for 3 years before joining the faculty at Purdue University in 2001.  He provides surgical services for all large animals with a focus on food animal surgery. He is the co-editor/author of two textbooks (Sheep and Goat Medicine, and McIlwraith and Turner's Techniques in Large Animal Surgery). 

Presentations

These presentations cover large food animal surgery techniques from simple field procedures to the more involved clinic procedures

These presentations will discuss common field procedures as well as more involved clinic techniques.

This presentation covers routine camelid surgical procedures for the large animal practitioner


Jennifer Koziol, DVM, MS, Diplomate of the American College of Theriogenologists

Jennifer Koziol, DVM, MS, Diplomate of the American College of Theriogenologists

Email: koziol1@purdue.edu

Jennifer was raised on a large cow-calf and stocker operation in northeast Oklahoma where she was involved in all areas of the ranch. She was heavily involved in 4-H, FFA and rodeo during her youth. Jennifer completed her undergraduate at Oklahoma State University obtaining a degree in Animal Science/Agribusiness before entering veterinary school there as well. Following vet school she completed a Comparative Theriogenology internship at Iowa State University and a residency in Theriogenology at Auburn University where she became board certified as a Diplomate of the American College of Theriogenologists. Jennifer is well versed in all areas of Theriogenology and food animal medicine and surgery. She has a special interest in the breeding bull, infectious diseases such as Tritrichomonas foetus and Anaplasma marginale, neonatology of the ruminant, as well as musculoskeletal and lameness issues that affect the bull and cow. She has spoken at numerous producer and veterinarian meetings at the local, regional, and national levels.

Presentations

Overview of the breeding soundness exam in the bull with special emphasis on commonly encountered lameness issues of the breeding bull and how we can diagnose and treat these problems.

An overview of Tritrichomonas foetus in bovine.

Ways that we as veterinarians can control parturition and why we would want to in the common domestic species.

Descriptions of common therapies and surgeries for injuries to the bull's penis, prepuce, scrotum and testes.

Overview of the most commonly encountered diseases of small ruminants, how we diagnose them and therapies that may be implemented for treatment.


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Pathobiology

Abigail Durkes, DVM, PhD, DACVP

Grant N. Burcham, DVM, PhD, Dipl ACVP

Email: gburcham@purdue.edu

​Dr. Burcham is a veterinary diagnostician currently practicing at the southern Indiana branch of the Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory (Heeke ADDL) located in Dubois, Indiana. He is a board-certified veterinary anatomic pathologist and focuses on the diseases of livestock and poultry. Special interests include infectious diseases of ruminants and swine, the pathobiology of toxic plants and pasture-based diseases, and diseases of domestic turkeys. Dr. Burcham also has experience with laboratory animal pathology, specifically mouse models of neoplasia and autoimmune disease. An enthusiastic supporter of diagnostic and laboratory-based medicine, Dr. Burcham is happy to tailor discussions to fit a particular topic.

Presentations

​An overview of diseases encountered in cattle kept on pasture throughout most or all of the year. The discussion features metabolic and nutritional diseases encountered on various forages, toxic plants / weeds present in the Midwest, and infectious diseases that are specific to cattle on pasture. Features descriptions and high-quality images from specific cases that illustrate each disease.

​Reproductive pathology in pigs has several potential causes, both infectious and non-infectious, and an accurate diagnosis depends on proper sampling. Because swine reproduction involves tissues/specimens from multiple individual organisms (e.g. boars, sows, fetuses), knowing which animals and which specimens to sample is critical to a successful diagnostic investigation. This presentation will review multiple infectious and non-infectious causes of reproductive failure in swine, with a focus on which specimens to collect and which assays to perform to ensure the best chances of diagnosis.

​A retrospective study of bovine autopsies from the ADDL showed that diseases of the respiratory and gastrointestinal systems were the most common causes of death in Indiana cattle. Using high-quality images from the ADDL database, this presentation highlights important diseases that affect cattle in the Midwest.

Note: This presentation can be changed to fit different species, depending on a group's interest.

Geared towards backyard chicken enthusiasts, this presentation focuses on diseases that affect small flocks of chickens and/or turkeys. The discussion can be tailored to suite adults, young adults, or children.


Abigail Durkes, DVM, PhD, DACVP

Abigail Durkes, DVM, PhD, DACVP

Email: adcox@purdue.edu

Dr. Durkes is a board-certified veterinary pathologist. She has expertise in the biology of the whole animal, spontaneous disease manifestations in both human and non-human animals, and in experimental disease models in the laboratory setting. Her qualifications allow her to conduct in-depth and thorough examination of gross tissues, histologic slides, and ultrastructural micrographs. Her research interests include evaluating medical device biocompatibility; as well as developing quantitative analyses of a variety of histologic preparations. She has a special interest in developing comparative animal models that investigate the biology and biomechanics of the larynx. Dr. Durkes is also a diagnostic pathologist with Purdue's Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory and teaches general pathology in veterinary school curriculum. She has a special interest in stimulating curiosity of veterinary pathology in young scientists and enjoys highlighting the impact veterinary pathology has on biomedical engineering, drug development, veterinary diagnostics, and overall disease research.​

Presentations

This presentation can be tweaked based on the audience. Veterinary pathology is often under-utilized, yet essential to the scientific process. This is often due to lack of knowledge of all that veterinary pathology encompasses. Veterinary pathology is integral in veterinary medice and diagnostics, biomedical research, and research methodology development. This presentation introduces different disciplines to the role of veterinary pathology/pathologists in the biomedical sciences.​

This presentation highlights different species and diagnostic tools that diagnostic veterinary pathologists utilize in autopsy/biopsy cases. The cases vary from the typical manifestations of common veterinary diseases to the weird and unusual diagnoses.​

This presentation summarizes the current literature involving ex vivo and in vivo animal models of human laryngeal diseases. The larynx is part of the upper respiratory system and is quintessential in phonation or voice. The biology of laryngeal diseases is difficult to study from human patients because access to the organ is difficult, and biopsy is inherently detrimental. Animal models are necessary to develop improved diagnostics and therapeutics, as well as understanding the basic pathophysiology of common human laryngeal diseases.

Approximately 7.5 million Americans are affected by a voice disorder at an annual cost of $2.5 billion. Voice disorders are complex and multi-faceted, as well as difficult to diagnose and treat. Prospective animal studies are necessary to study the pathophysiology of voice disorders, optimize our understanding of laryngeal pathology, and improve treatment outcomes. The pig provides a unique opportunity to test hypotheses relating to laryngeal disease because porcine vocal folds are most similar to human vocal folds from a structural, biochemical, neuromuscular, and cellular perspective. This seminar will present data on using the pig to study a common voice disorder, laryngopharyngeal reflux. This pig model attempts to mimic the clinical situation of human LPR more closely by challenging healthy, uninjured laryngeal epithelium. Future plans are to utilize a similar model to investigate other common laryngeal diseases that afflict the human population, including Reinke’s edema and vocal fold paralysis.​


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Small Animal

Larry Adams, DVM, PhD, DACVIM (Small Animal Internal Medicine)

Larry Adams, DVM, PhD, DACVIM (Small Animal Internal Medicine)

Email: adamslg@purdue.edu

Dr. Adams is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine in the specialty of Small Animal Internal Medicine. Dr. Adams received his DVM from Auburn University in 1984.  He completed a small animal internship, medicine residency and PhD at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Adams has been on the faculty of Purdue University since 1991 where he is Professor of Small Animal Internal Medicine. He has presented lectures at more than 220 veterinary meetings throughout North America, Europe and Asia. He has received 10 teaching awards including the 2009 National Pfizer Distinguished Teacher Award.  Dr. Adams research interests are in clinical veterinary nephrology and urology including hemodialysis, minimally invasive management techniques for urinary tract diseases and nutritional therapy of urinary tract diseases. Please contact Dr. Adams for a list of potential topics and descriptions of the lectures.  These can be adjusted to meet the needs of the veterinary association. 

Presentations

Aimee Brooks, DVM, MS, DACVECC

Aimee Brooks, DVM, MS, DACVECC

Email: brook108@purdue.edu

I received my DVM degree from Michigan State University in 2008 and completed a small animal rotating internship at the University of Wisconsin in 2009.  I then worked as a small animal ER doctor at Wisconsin Veterinary Referral center until 2011, when I moved to The Ohio State University to complete a residency/masters program in small animal emergency/critical care.  I joined Purdue as a clinical assistant professor and became a boarded member of ACVECC in 2014 and have been living happily in Lafayette with my husband Dave and heeler mix Mack since that time.  My professional interests include clinical teaching, point of care ultrasound, vascular access, clinical toxicology, coagulation, trauma, SIRS/Sepsis, and fluid therapy, among other things (like most ECC folks, I like a little bit of everything!)  With advanced notice, I am happy to speak on any small animal ECC related topic beyond the ones listed below.   

Presentations

This lecture reviews preparedness and performance of basic and advanced life support in dogs and cats. For smaller groups, a lab using canine CPR models can also be included.

This lecture series uses clinical cases to cover approaches to common toxins encountered in small animal medicine, including ethylene glycol, rodenticides, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug overdoses, amphetamines, and grape/raisin toxicosis. This lecture series is 2 hours but could be condensed (or expanded to include other toxicoses) as needed to cover toxins of interest/decontamination techniques.

This lecture covers pathophysiology and emergent stabilization of diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome

This lecture reviews the physiology of oxygenation and ventilation, differentials for hypo/hyperventilation and hypoxemia, and discusses arterial blood gas interpretation

This lecture will cover the basics of triage with an emphasis on emergent assessment and stabilization of the small animal trauma patient. 


Michael Childress, DVM, MS, DACVIM (Oncology)

Michael Childress, DVM, MS, DACVIM (Oncology)

Email: mochildr@purdue.edu

Dr. Childress obtained his DVM degree from the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine in 2004. He subsequently completed a rotating internship at the Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine from 2004-2005, an oncology internship at the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine from 2005-2006, and a medical oncology residency at the Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine from 2006-2009. He is currently an associate professor of comparative oncology with the Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine and chief of the medical oncology section within the Purdue Veterinary Teaching Hospital. His research focuses on developing new therapies and identifying novel prognostic and predictive biomarkers for canine lymphomas.​

Presentations

This lecture​ focuses on the diagnosis and staging of common and uncommon forms of lymphoma, as well as established and emerging treatments. The focus of the talk will be on choosing the appropriate treatment for individual dogs with lymphoma, emphasizing pros and cons of each treatment option.

​This lecture will discuss the principles of administering cancer chemotherapy, including appropriate drug selection, dosing, and management of treatment-related side effects. The concept of chemotherapy drugs as workplace health hazards will be discussed, as will methods to minimize the exposure of workplace personnel to chemotherapy drug residues.

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) encompasses a diverse array of herbal, nutraceutical, physical, and other treatments whose use is generally not taught in conventional U.S. medical or veterinary school curricula. CAM is popular with owners of pets with cancer, but many veterinarians are unfamiliar with the potential benefits or risks of CAM therapies. This lecture will review several popular CAM therapies and cover strategies for discussing CAM with pet owners.

​The expense of cancer diagnosis, staging, and treatment is often a significant barrier to practicing effective small animal oncology in a general practice setting. This session will feature in-depth discussion of several strategies to reduce the cost of cancer management, while still providing compassionate and high-quality care.

While there is not a dogmatically “correct” way to manage many canine and feline cancers, certain principles of cancer therapy should be followed in most cases. Failure to adhere to these principles will produce suboptimal care for patients. This lecture will review commonly-encountered mistakes in the diagnosis, staging, and treatment of cancer patients, as well as strategies for avoiding these pitfalls.


Christopher Fulkerson, DVM, MS, DACVIM (Oncology)

Christopher Fulkerson, DVM, MS, DACVIM (Oncology)

Email: cfulkers@purdue.edu

Dr. Fulkerson is a board-certified veterinary oncologist and a clinical assistant professor of veterinary medical oncology.  He earned his DVM and MS degrees from Purdue University.  His primary interests include novel drug development, reducing chemotherapy side effects and communicating with pet owners about cancer.

Presentations

A review of current knowledge of bladder cancer in dogs including a review of current research, diagnostics and treatment options.

A review of the management of chemotherapy side effects and unique toxicity associated with commonly used chemotherapy drugs.


Paulo Gomes, DVM, DACVD

Paulo Gomes, DVM, DACVD

Email: gomesp@purdue.edu

Clinical Assistant Professor of Veterinary Dermatology at Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine. Board Certified by the American College of Veterinary Medicine. Completed a Residency in Comparative Dermatology at the University of Minnesota Veterinary Clinical Science Department.  DVM degree from Sao Paulo State University (Unesp).

Presentations

A review of the pemphigus complex. A group of 5 autoimmune skin diseases characterized by the presence of pustular, crusting dermatitis, and vesicle formation.


Paula Johnson, BS, DVM

Paula Johnson, BS, DVM

Email: johns357@purdue.edu

  • Graduate of Xavier University of New Orleans: B.S. Chemistry Premed May 1990
  • Louisiana State University College of Veterinary medicine: DVM May 1995
  • Small Animal Medicine and Surgery Rotating Internship: Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine 1995-1996
  • Associate Veterinarian: Animal Emergency of Lake County, emergency work, nights weekends and holidays. 1996-1998
  • Residency in Emergency and Critical Care: University of Missouri-Columbia College of Veterinary Medicine 1998-2002
  • Clinical Instructor Emergency and Critical Care:  University of Missouri-Columbia College of Veterinary Medicine, 2002-2003
  • Emergency and Critical Care Clinician: Veterinary Specialty Center, Buffalo Grove Illinois,  2003-2008
  • Clinical Assistant Professor, Section Chief of Emergency and Critical Care:  Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine, 2008-Present
Presentations

Presentation of the current guidelines and recommendations for cardiopulmonary resuscitation in canine and feline patients.

Presentation on fluid therapy in small animal canine and feline patients. Presentation includes discussion on physiology of fluid compartments, replacement and maintenance fluid rates, types of fluids (crystalloids, colloids, special fluids) and Case examples.

Presentation includes a discussion on the pathophyisiology of shock and the different types.  Stages of shock and treatment of the different types of shock is also covered.

Presentation includes discussion on blood products, transfusion administration and monitoring, transfusion complications, blood typing, crossmatching and some information on blood banking

The why and how: Presentation provides an overview of mechanical ventilation, what’s most important, why and when to ventilate? Also includes caring for the ventilator patient, potential complications associated with ventilatory therapy and weaning from the ventilator.


Mark Rochat, DVM, MS, DACVS

Mark Rochat, DVM, MS, DACVS

Email: mrochat@purdue.edu

​Dr. Rochat graduated from Mississippi State University in 1986. After a small animal internship at Oklahoma State University and general small animal practice, he completed a residency at the University of Missouri. He joined a surgical referral practice in Chicago, became board certified in 1993, and then took a position at Oklahoma State University where he rose to the rank of Professor. He served in numerous capacities, developing and guiding the small animal surgical residency, and advising many students over the course of 22 years. In 2015, he moved to Purdue University as a Clinical Professor of Small Animal Orthopedics and Section Chief of Small Animal Surgery. He has authored over 135 articles, book chapters, abstracts, posters, and web-based publications and given over 300 presentations at local, state, regional, national, and international meetings. His professional interests include trauma, external skeletal fixation, fracture management, arthroscopy, total joint replacement, wound management, and reconstructive surgery.

Presentations

J. Catharine Scott-Moncrieff, VET MB, MA, MS

J. Catharine Scott-Moncrieff, VET MB, MA, MS

Email: scottmon@purdue.edu

Catharine Scott-Moncrieff received her Veterinary Degree from the University of Cambridge in 1985. She completed an internship in small animal medicine and surgery at the University of Saskatchewan, Canada, and a residency and Master of Science degree in internal medicine at Purdue University. In 1989 she joined the faculty of Purdue University, where she is currently Professor of small animal internal medicine and head of the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences. She is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (small animal), the European College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (companion animal), and has a Diploma in Small Animal Medicine from the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons. Her research and clinical interests are canine and feline endocrinology.

Presentations

This lecture will focus on treatment of canine and feline diabetes mellitus. Topics will include insulin choice, diabetic monitoring, and management of diabetes in the presence of concurrent illness. The lecture will also discuss alternative strategies for cases that do not respond well to the initial choice of insulin.

This lecture will review advances in diagnosis and treatment of feline hyperthyroidism. Topics will include diagnosis of hyperthyroidism in presence of concurrent illness, diagnosis and management of treatment associated hypothyroidism, association between hypertension and hyperthyroidism, and nutritional management of feline hyperthyroidism.

This presentation will discuss the diverse presentations of Addison's disease and highlight the challenges of diagnosing different case presentations. Case examples will be used to highlight differences in approach to diagnosis treatment and monitoring between typical and atypical Addison's disease.

This lecture will discuss the medical treatment for spontaneous canine hyperadrenocorticism.  The lecture will address the advantages and disadvantages of mitotane and trilostane. The lecture will also review how to transition safely between mitotane and trilostane when indicated. 

This lecture will outline an approach to problems of insulin regulation in diabetic dogs and cats using a case based approach. The lecture will cover problems such as owner compliance, short duration of insulin action, insulin induced hypoglycemia, and insulin resistance. Case examples will be used to illustrate each problem.


Sarah Steinbach,DVM, Diplomate, ACVIM-SAIM, Diplomate ECVIM-CA

Sarah Steinbach,DVM, Diplomate, ACVIM-SAIM, Diplomate ECVIM-CA

Email: ssteinba@purdue.edu

Dr. Steinbach is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine in the specialty of Small Animal Internal Medicine. She graduated from the Vetsuisse Faculty University of Bern, Switzerland in 2008. After an Internship at the Vetsuisse Faculty University of Bern, Switzerland she completed a Residency in Small Animal Internal Medicine at the Justus-Liebig University, Giessen, Germany and The Royal Veterinary College, London, United Kingdom. Dr. Steinbach has been on the faculty of Purdue University since 2015, where she is Co-Director of the Purdue Veterinary Hemodialysis Service. Her main area of work and research interests are in clinical nephrology and urology, with a special interest in acute and chronic hemodialysis and interventional urology. Dr. Steinbach has presented lectures nationally as well as internationally. The lectures listed are examples and please do not hesitate to contact Dr. Steinbach directly to discuss further potential lecture topics.

Presentations

This lecture covers the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to acute kidney injury (AKI). It includes how to differentiate between acute and chronic kidney disease, and how to exclude pre- or post-renal components. It focusses on staging AKI and guides through medical management of AKI patients as well as giving indication to as when to refer. Basics of hemodialysis in a veterinary patient are covered as well.

This lecture covers the basic principles of hemodialysis. Which patients can profit? When do I refer? How does it work? What are the costs? These are just some of the questions getting answered. This lecture is available for veterinarians as well as veterinary technicians.

Beside the diagnostic approach to a patient with potential chronic kidney disease (CKD), this lecture covers the most recent changes to the IRIS system. The different therapeutic approaches and intervention in each IRIS stage are discussed and it gives assistance on how to incorporate the new renal biomarker SDMA (symmetric dimethyl arginine) in the decision making.

This lecture covers the work-up and therapeutic approaches of patients with glomerular disease as outlined by the consensus statements published by ACVIM.


Elizabeth Thomovsky, DVM, MS, DACVECC

Elizabeth Thomovsky, DVM, MS, DACVECC

Email: ethomovs@purdue.edu

Dr. Thomovsky graduated from the University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine in 2001.  She completed a rotating internship at the University of Illinois before working for three years as a general practitioner in Pennsylvania.  She then returned to Missouri to complete her residency in ER and Critical Care in 2008.  She worked for three years at the University of Wisconsin in their ECC department before coming to Purdue in 2011.

Presentations

This talk can focus on cats, dogs, or both species. It presents the approach to acute respiratory distress in an emergency setting including recognition of the various types of distress and treatments for each category. 

This presentation gives an algorithmic approach to treating seizures in dogs and cats on an emergent basis. It goes over treatments available and when to use each treatment to stabilize the animal.

This topic can be presented as a lecture or as a lecture with a concurrent ECG interpretation session post-lecture. The talk presents a way to look at and confidently approach ECGs for the most common arrhythmias seen in animals presenting emergently. 

The speaker has a series of talks related to neonatology. The first talk is what is normal in a neonate.  The second talk presents ways to treat the sick neonate.  The third talk goes over neonatal pharmacology.  The fourth talk presents fading puppy and kitten syndromes and how to treat them.  The fifth talk presents dystocia and neonatal resuscitation.

The speaker also has a series of talks on the five most common toxicities as well as common cat emergencies and how to diagnose and treat them emergently.


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Toxicology

Steven Hooser, DVM, PhD, DABVT

Steven Hooser, DVM, PhD, DABVT

Email: shooser1@purdue.edu

Dr. Hooser has interacted with veterinarians and animal owners on cases of exposure to a wide variety of poisons. He teaches veterinary toxicology and has given numerous presentations to the public and veterinary professionals. He is professor of Veterinary Toxicology, past-president of the American Board of Veterinary Toxicology, past director of the Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory, and president-elect of the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians.

Presentations

A brief overview of veterinary toxicology that can be tailored to any species or category of animals or type of poison (e.g., poisonous plants, feed-related poisons, common poisons around the house and holidays, etc.) and presented to any group from the public or profession.


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