Left behind: How to prepare pets for a post-pandemic life

Monday, January 4, 2021

Make Your Mark
Support the College


In this photo provided by Raghav Ranjan, Devika Ranjan smiles at her cat, Aloo, on Dec. 13, 2020, in Andover, Mass. Ranjan, a theater director in Chicago, wanted pandemic company and got a rescue cat she named Aloo during the summer. The formerly feral cat is believed to be around 3, and seems to be very comfortable with a slow-paced, high-attention pandemic life. “My working from home, I think he loves it,” she says. “I think he is just ready to settle down in life. If he were human, he'd probably sit on the couch with a PBR (beer) and watch TV all day." (Raghav Ranjan via AP)
In this photo provided by Raghav Ranjan, Devika Ranjan smiles at her cat, Aloo, on Dec. 13, 2020, in Andover, Mass. Ranjan, a theater director in Chicago, wanted pandemic company and got a rescue cat she named Aloo during the summer. The formerly feral cat is believed to be around 3, and seems to be very comfortable with a slow-paced, high-attention pandemic life. “My working from home, I think he loves it,” she says. “I think he is just ready to settle down in life. If he were human, he’d probably sit on the couch with a PBR (beer) and watch TV all day.” (Raghav Ranjan via AP)

Dr. Candace Croney sat down with the Associated Press to provide some tip for how to help your furry friends prepare for you return to campus, the office, & other work places.

Read her tips at the Associated Press – Left behind: How to prepare pets for a post-pandemic life


Writer(s): Kevin Doerr | pvmnews@purdue.edu


Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine, 625 Harrison Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, (765) 494-7607

© 2021 Purdue University | An equal access/equal opportunity university | Copyright Complaints | Maintained by PVM Web Communications

If you have trouble accessing this page because of a disability, please contact PVM Web Communications at vetwebteam@purdue.edu.