Antimicrobial Resistance

Anitmicrobial

Antibiotics are common therapeutic tools used in treatment and prevention of infections in both humans and animals. However, excessive and indiscriminate use of antibiotics in human healthcare and livestock production in the past few decades resulted in microbes that are resistant to these crucial antibiotics. As a result, treatments and therapies to antibiotic resistant infections are getting limited, longer, expensive and less safe.  Researchers at Purdue veterinary medicine conduct both basic and translational research to tackle the crisis of antimicrobial resistance.  

Faculty:

Mohamed Seleem

Dr. Seleem

SECTION HEAD OF MICROBIOLOGY & IMMUNOLOGY
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF MICROBIOLOGY

Contact Dr. Mohamed Saleem for more information

It is difficult to imagine an issue that summarizes the principles of One Health more than antimicrobial resistance does. Antimicrobial resistance does not recognize geographic or human-animal borders and addressing the rising threat of antimicrobial resistance requires a One Health-driven engagement.  Our research is focused on developing new antimicrobials and on improved delivery of drugs for the treatment of infectious diseases that affect both humans and animals. The group also is developing an early detection and identification of a single bacterium/fungus in a complex environment. This development will shift the paradigm of diagnosis from a time-consuming, cultivation-dependent procedure to a culture-independent, in situ approach. Further clinical translation of the proposed technology would save patients’ lives with the early diagnosis of infection and accurate profiling of a pathogen’s susceptibility to antimicrobials.

  


Dr. Sanjeev Narayanan

Dr. Narayanan
PROFESSOR AND HEAD, DEPARTMENT OF COMPARATIVE PATHOBIOLOGY

Contact Dr. Narayanan for more information

Dr. Narayanan’s research focuses on cause and spread of antimicrobial resistance in gut microflora and food borne pathogens like E . Coli, Enterococcus and Salmonella using cattle feedlot industry as a model. His lab researches on developing new tools and practices to help reduce the use of antibiotics in food animals, which in turn affects human and environmental health through reduced spread of antibiotic resistance.  Efforts are under way to replace antibiotic usage for important cattle diseases (eg. liver abscesses) with vaccines.


Lynn F. Guptill

Guptill
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, SMALL ANIMAL INTERNAL MEDICINE; CO-SECTION HEAD, SMALL ANIMAL INTERNAL MEDICINE

Contact Dr. Lynn F. Guptill for more information


Dr. Jean Stiles

Jean Stiles
PROFESSOR, OPHTHALMOLOGY; SECTION HEAD, OPHTHALMOLOGY

Contact Dr. Jean Stiles for more information


Dr. Deepti Pillai

Deepti Pillai
CLINICAL ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, DIAGNOSTIC MICROBIOLOGY

Contact Dr. Deepti Pillai for more information


Dr. Kenitra Hammac

Kenitra Hammac
CLINICAL ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF VETERINARY DIAGNOSTIC MICROBIOLOGY

Contact Dr. Kenitra Hammac for more information


“A lack of effective antibiotics is as serious a security threat as a sudden and deadly disease outbreak,” –Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of World Health Organization (WHO)

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