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Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Aquatic Animal Health

8:30 a.m. - 9:20 a.m.

Dr. Jennifer Strasser - APHIS Module

Disease Prevention and Bio-Security in Aquaculture

This module reviews general biosecurity topics (prevention, control and eradication) for aquatic animal production systems, including biosecurity practices and proper handling of animals and equipment during site visits, and the appropriate use of personal protective equipment for various situations. The proper use and dosages of different disinfectants in aquaculture and designing an appropriate cleaning and disinfection plan are reviewed.


9:30 a.m. - 10:20 a.m.

Dr. Myron Kebus

Water Quality Basics

This presentation will cover the primary and secondary water quality parameters that affect fish health. Disease signs associated with water quality problems will be presented, along with steps that veterinarians can recommend to help prevent water quality caused diseases of fish. 


10:50 a.m. - 11:40 a.m.

Dr. Myron Kebus

Fish Practice Toolbox

This presentation will cover what veterinarians can do to provide fish medicine services to their clients. It will include discussion on how to perform gross examinations, on-site light microscopy, sample collection for laboratory testing, organisms, and necropsies. 


12:00 p.m. - 12:50 p.m.

Lunchtime CE

Dr. Jennifer Strasser - APHIS Module

Aquatic Animal Diseases and Related Regulatory Activities

This module explains the role of the accredited veterinarian in aquatic animal disease control and eradication; describes the common clinical signs of diseases in aquatic animals as well as potential disease differentials. Basic diagnostic sampling and submission procedures and laboratory diagnostics used for aquatic animal reporting procedures are described. The OIE reportable diseases are discussed as well as several disease incursion examples.


1:00 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.

Dr. Myron Kebus

Fish Parasites, Bacteria, Viruses and Fungi

This presentation will cover some of the most commonly seen parasitic, bacterial, viral and fungal diseases of farmed fish, along with steps that veterinarians can use to treat and prevent the diseases these organisms cause.


2:00 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.

Dr. Myron Kebus

Cases of Fish Disease We Have Seen On Fish Farms Toolbox

This presentation will cover several cases of fish disease on fish farms. The participants will be presented with the history, finding, differential lists and diagnoses along with treatments and management.

Aquatic Animal Health - Hands-On Training: Fish Medicine

3:15 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

Dr. Myron Kebus, Dr. Jennifer Strasser

Live Fish Diagnostics, Necropsy & Sampling Anatomy

Fee: $40/person

Limit: 20 participants

Lynn Hall 2214

This wet lab will provide participants an opportunity to perform and practice fin clips, wet gill mounts, necropsies, sampling for disease testing, and other techniques that are used by veterinarians on fish farms. 

Thursday, September 12, 2013

Professional Development "Practice Communications"

8:30 a.m. - 9:20 a.m.

Dr. Karen Cornell

Conflict Resolution Within the Practice Team Part I

Conflict within the veterinary healthcare is inevitable and costly. However, when handled well, conflict can be production. This session will continue to focus on identifying the key components of conflict and how to best address those within the team. This session is the first of two sessions. It is highly recommended that individuals attend both sessions in order to gain the most benefit.


9:30 a.m. - 10:20 a.m.

Dr. Karen Cornell

Conflict Resolution within the Practice Team Part II

Conflict within the veterinary healthcare is inevitable and costly. However, when handled well conflict can be productive. This session will continue to focus on identifying the key components of conflict and how to best address those within the team. This session is a continuation of the previous session. It is highly recommended that individuals attend both sessions in order to gain the most benefit.


10:50 a.m. - 11:40 a.m.

Bill Schroeder

The Social Vet Part I

You’ve heard the buzz about social media but may not know how to start, where to focus your attention, and/or how to develop content that encourages interaction. This course will help you identify today’s most beneficial social channels, introduce you to some techniques that engage your clients, and identify who should be managing your social media program.


12:00 p.m. - 12:50 p.m.

Lunchtime CE

Dr. Richard Goebel

Veterinary Management Essentials


1:00 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.

Bill Schroeder

The Social Vet Part II

Online reviews have become a very popular method for pet owners to share their feelings about veterinary practices. In turn, many people reviews when selecting a veterinary practice. The course will help practices understand the review process, how to promote positive reviews, and how to manage the negative.


2:00 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.

Dr. Ruth Landau

Supporting Latino Clients Part I: Habla Espanol? Si!

Latinos are the fastest-growing ethnic group in the United States. By 2050, it is projected that Latinos will comprise 30% of the U.S. population. Despite the Latino population explosion, little is known about the quality of veterinary care provided to pets of Spanish-speaking owners who have limited English proficiency (LEP). We will discuss results from three national studies that describe the veterinary communication experience between LEP Latino pet owners and the small animal veterinary team. 


3:20 p.m. - 4:10 p.m.

Dr. Ruth Landau

Supporting Latino Clients Part II: Getting from HOLA to GRACIAS!

Perro? Gato? Hola! Chau! Have you ever felt challenged to communicate with non-English-speaking clients about their dog or cat? Join us for a lively discussion about ways to improve communication in your hospital with Spanish-speaking pet owners who have limited English proficiency. Leave the session with new resources to enhance your take-home message. No Spanish language background needed!

Friday, September 13, 2013

Vet Tech Specialty Workshops

8:30 a.m. - 10:20 a.m.

Brandy Sprunger

Using Kirby's Rule of Twenty to Develop Nursing Plans

Fee: $40/person  

Limit: 40 Participants

Stewart Center Room 318

Using pre-set lists like Kirby’s Rule of Twenty of human nursing diagnosis, veterinary technicians can improve patient outcomes through more vigilant monitoring. Creating templates to use in a clinical setting is fairly simple, and can be incorporated into most veterinary software programs. Allowing technicians some autonomy in patient care also increases their job satisfaction and leaves more time for veterinarians to see additional cases. 


10:40 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Carissa Sparks

The Complete Neurologic Examination

Fee:  $25/person

Limit:  40 Participants

Veterinary Complex - Farriery

 



Cytology Lab for DVMs: Lymphoid Tissue, Liver and Skin

Apologies, but this workshop has been cancelled.

Shelter Medicine

View Shelter Medicine Flier Here (pdf)

8:30 a.m. - 9:20 a.m.

Dr. David Bash & Jill Kooiman

How We Did It: ReTails- A Unique Pet Adoption Venture

History, rationale, mission and operations of reTails Adoptions Store in Indianapolis. A unique all volunteer, mall-based pet adoption store. 


9:30 a.m. - 10:20 p.m.

Dr. Gary Lantz

Decision Making in Practical Shelter Dentistry

A brief review of practical dental anatomy will be followed by a review of selected commonly encountered oral pathologies. Diagnostic and treatment options will be presented. The focus will be basic economical shelter dentistry with the goal of increasing adoptability of these animals. 


10:40 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Bill Schroeder

The Social Shelter

Many shelters are interested in sharing their message via today’s most exciting medium, social media. This course will help shelters identify some of the most beneficial social media channels and will discuss techniques which will help excite pet owners about adoptions, drive contributions towards donating time or money, and ultimately share the story that is your shelter.


11:40 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Sheryl Walker

Dog Training Tricks to Increase Adoptability

This session will review tips and methods to increase the adoptability of shelter dogs using positive reinforcement training. Research, as well as real life examples, will be discussed. This session is required for the afternoon training workshop.

Shelter Medicine Hands-On Workshop

2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Dr. Sara Bennett, Dr. Niwako Ogata, Melinda Cotton

How to Teach Shelter Dogs Three Simple Cues to Maximize Their Adoptability

Fee:  $15/participant (2 CE)

Limit: 40 participants, 24 observers (no fee)

Session attendees will learn about and observe three basic training exercises being applied to shelter dogs that will help to improve the dog’s behavior, presentation to the public, and consequently, its adoptability. They will then have the opportunity to practice teaching these techniques to a group of shelter dogs with the goal of learning how to apply these training exercises to dogs they encounter, whether in a shelter, rescue, kennel or veterinary setting, after completing the session. 

Homeland Security

8:30 a.m. - 9:20 a.m.

Dr. Marianne Ash & Dr. Maria Cooper

Principles of Outbreak Investigation

Drs. Marianna Ash and Maria Cooper of the Indiana State Board of Animal Health will discuss principles of disease outbreak investigation while focusing on the importance of combining conventional approaches with novel technologies. When diseases of high economic or public health consequence strike, there is an urgency to identify a source and contain the disease to prevent additional cases. Oftentimes, the health of our livestock, the safety and security of our food and the fitness of our agricultural economy depend on the investigation progressing at rapid speed. Innovative data management strategies along with a solid system for animal traceability are vital to a timely response, and the veterinary team plays an integral role in its success. Drs. Ash and Cooper will discuss these approaches and provide real-world examples that can cause crucial delays during an investigation. 


9:30 a.m. - 10:20 a.m.

Dr. Terry Donat 

Electromagnetic Pulse Events


The US power grid is critically vulnerable to adverse space weather, terrestrial hazards, intentional (physical/electronic) disruption, and neglect.  Electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) have the greatest potential to impact power availability--- across all scales of production, distribution, and use--- given pervasive grid vulnerabilities, control system designs, and cultural reliance upon microcircuitry. EMP origins, detrimental effects, cascading implications and national/local mitigation status efforts are real concerns for biosecurity, emergency planning and business continuity


10:30 a.m. - 11:20 a.m.

Dr. Terry Donat

Medical Intelligence

One overarching objective of the Homeland Security enterprise is to orient, integrate and coordinate actions which prioritize, promote and protect animal, human and plant (crop) biosecurity.  Medical intelligence provides critical strategic and tactical information--- to individuals, businesses, government agencies and NGOs--- for guiding daily actions and emergency responses.  Veterinarians, medical providers, and agricultural/environmental specialists provide welcome expertise and perspectives for prospecting future threats, discriminating current conditions, and managing incidents as evolving security community colleagues. 


12:00 p.m. - 12:50 p.m.

Lunchtime CE

Dr. Frank Wilson - APHIS Module

Overview of Foreign Animal, USDA Program, and Reportable Diseases

This module introduces readers to a variety of foreign animal, USDA Program and reportable diseases and contains a list of which diseases are applicable to Category I and Category II accredited veterinarians. Information about reporting diseases and the steps in a foreign animal disease investigation are provided. Details about additional training opportunities for accredited veterinarians are also included along with a multitude of resources and learning opportunities to stay informed about these diseases.


1:00 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.

Dr. Michael Stebbins

Impact of Animal Rights Extremists

Those who oppose humane and responsible research, and in particular, radical animal rights extremists, are a threat to the biomedical and veterinary research enterprise. This session will discuss the importance of animal research, and shine the light on the groups that are trying to stop it. It will also provide ways to talk about the benefits of animal research to a general audience.

Pet Birds

8:30 a.m. - 9:20 a.m.

Dr. Ken Welle

Diagnostic Assessment of the Avian Patient

Avian patients often present with vague, non-specific signs. The ability to interpret subtle findings, and to plan, implement, and interpret diagnostic tests is essential to practicing avian medicine. 


9:30 a.m. - 10:20 a.m.

Dr. Ken Welle

Avian Radiology

The ability to accurately position the bird, take diagnostic images, and interpret the results is critical to the practice of avian medicine. This session will introduce both normal and pathologic radiographic findings, as well as introducing alternative imaging modalities.


10:40 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Dr. Ken Welle

Avian Theriogenology and Obstetrics

Birds have unique reproductive systems that are frequently the target of medical conditions. A strong knowledge of the anatomy, physiology, and a logical approach to management can help resolve many of these problems. 


11:40 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Dr. Steve Thompson, Dr. Lori Corriveau

The Wild and Wacky World of Dr. DooALot for A Little Guy

This session will involve interactive case presentations on several interesting bird cases that highlight medical work and surgical care for avian patients.